Monday, July 9, 2018

PRO/AH/EDR> Rabies (38): Americas (USA) deer, fox, skunk

RABIES (38): AMERICAS (USA) DEER, FOX, SKUNK
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In this update:
[1] Maine: fox (3), skunk
[2] North Carolina: deer

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[1] Maine: fox (3), skunk
Date: Tue 3 Jul 2018
Source: Sun Journal [edited]
<http://www.sunjournal.com/brunswick-police-report-fourth-attack-by-rabid-wild-animal/>


Brunswick police on Tuesday [3 Jul 2018] said there appears to be a
"widespread rabies epidemic" in the city after a 4th confirmed case of
the disease. Police were notified this week that a 4th wild animal has
tested positive for rabies in the past 3 weeks. A rabid animal -- a
fox -- attacked a man who was gardening on Bouchard Drive on 29 Jun
2018. The man was able to subdue the fox with a shovel without being
exposed, according to police.

On 13 Jun 2018, a woman on High Street let her dog outside, where it
got into a fight with a skunk that later tested positive for rabies.
The woman tried to keep the skunk at bay by spraying it with a hose,
police said.

Later that week, a rabid fox attacked a Brunswick woman who was
retrieving her mail and then bit a neighbor who tried to help her.
Both residents were treated at Mid Coast Hospital, and the fox was
shot by a police officer. The 72-year-old woman later said the fox
"looked vicious" and knocked her off her feet and bit her on her legs
and arm.

On 25 Jun 2018, a 95-year-old man was repairing the deck on his home
on Breckan Road when a fox approached him. Robert Galen used a broken
plank to fend off the fox, which later tested positive for rabies.
"I'd been aware of the rabies incidents in Brunswick, so I almost
instinctively hit this animal on the head with the club I had,
fortunately, in my hand," Galen said after his encounter with the
fox.

Animals have tested positive for rabies in the downtown, Meadowbrook,
Pleasant Street and River Road areas, police said.

"It is imperative that all animals that can be vaccinated are current
on their rabies shots," Commander Mark Waltz said in a statement.
"Residents and visitors should also be extra vigilant when they
encounter wildlife."

Rabies is a disease that affects the brain and spinal cord and is
usually spread through a bite or scratch from a wild animal that has
the virus. If left untreated, it can be fatal.

[Byline: Gillian Graham]

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[2] North Carolina: deer
Date: Fri 6 Jul 2018
Source: WSPA.com TV [edited]
<https://www.wspa.com/news/deer-tests-positive-for-rabies-in-buncombe-co/1287364406>


Buncombe County Health and Human Service officials said a deer found
off of Newfound Road in Leicester has been confirmed to have rabies.
According to health officials, the deer was taken to Buncombe County
Animal Control on 5 Jul 2018, and the animal tested positive for
rabies at the North Carolina State Lab.

"Rabies is a serious disease that can be deadly without immediate
treatment. Any person who thinks they may have come into contact with
this deer should contact BCHHS Communicable Disease at (828)
250-5109," Jessica Silver, BCHHS Environmental Health Director, said.

To report wildlife showing signs of rabies [in North Carolina], call
the NC Wildlife Helpline at 886-318-2401.

The following are things health officials are asking area residents to
do:
- Contact your doctor as soon as possible if you believe you or your
child came in contact with the deer.
- Contact your veterinarian as soon as possible if you believe your
pet came in contact with the deer. Be sure that pets are up-to-date on
their rabies vaccinations per North Carolina law.
- Avoid wild or unfamiliar animals: keep children and pets away from
wild or unfamiliar animals, keep your pet on a leash when out for a
walk, and do not rescue or touch wild or unfamiliar animals.
- If your pet comes in contact with a wild or unfamiliar animal, avoid
contact with both animals.
- Contact Animal Control if you see an animal acting strangely or if
you, someone else, or your pet comes in contact with a wild or
unfamiliar animal.

- If you have been bitten by any animal:
1. Clean your wound thoroughly for at least 10 minutes with soap and
water.
2. Immediately contact the appropriate jurisdiction's Animal Control
if you or your pet is bitten to assist in capturing the animal for
observation and/or rabies testing.
3. See a medical provider for wound evaluation and possible
treatment.

- "Post-exposure vaccines" can prevent rabies disease in humans if
started as soon as possible after the exposure and before the
development of symptoms. If a person bitten by an animal with rabies
does not get the recommended rabies post-exposure treatment, survival
is rare.
- Any medical provider who cares for someone who has been bitten by an
animal must report the animal bite within 24 hours. If the animal is
caught and tested and does not have rabies, exposed persons will not
need post-exposure vaccines.

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[For information on wildlife reservoirs of rabies in the USA, see:
<http://www.cdc.gov/rabies/exposure/animals/wildlife_reservoirs.html>.

Despite its ability to infect all mammals, rabies virus persists in
numerous species-specific cycles that rarely sustain transmission in
alternative species. Historically in North America, skunk rabies
occurs mainly in 4 geographical regions: (1) southern Ontario and
Quebec and upper New York State; (2) the north-central United States
and the Canadian provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta; (3)
California; and (4) south-central United States (Texas and several
adjacent states, including northern Louisiana). The variant of
terrestrial rabies present along the east coast is maintained by
raccoons. Fox rabies has been essentially eradicated in Ontario,
Canada but it persists in the adjoining northeast American states.

Rabies in deer is unusual and reflects contact with another wildlife
species, in this case probably a rabid raccoon. - Mod.MHJ

HealthMap/ProMED maps available at:
Maine, United States: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/222>
North Carolina, United States: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/235>]

[See Also:
2016
----
Rabies - Americas (24): USA (NC,MD) feline, canine, wildlife, human
exp http://promedmail.org/post/20160712.4339594
2015
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Rabies - USA (37): (NC) fox, human exposure, APHIS meeting
http://promedmail.org/post/20151003.3687790
Rabies - USA (23): (NC) canine, human exp
http://promedmail.org/post/20150717.3517862
2014
----
Rabies - USA (36): (NC) feline, possible human exposure
http://promedmail.org/post/20141218.3042398
Rabies - USA (26): (NC) canine, possible human exposure
http://promedmail.org/post/20140921.2790949
2010
----
Rabies, feline, canine, bat - USA: (NC, IL)
http://promedmail.org/post/20100509.1519
Rabies, wildlife - USA (02): (NC) fox, human exposure
http://promedmail.org/post/20100109.0104
2009
----
Rabies, feline, human & canine exposure - USA: (ME)
http://promedmail.org/post/20090911.3208
2008
----
Rabies - USA: (GA, ME), skunk, feline, canine
http://promedmail.org/post/20081110.3527]
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