Monday, August 27, 2018

PRO/AH/EDR> Crimean-Congo hem. fever - Afghanistan (03): update

CRIMEAN-CONGO HEMORRHAGIC FEVER - AFGHANISTAN (03): UPDATE
**********************************************************
A ProMED-mail post
<http://www.promedmail.org>
ProMED-mail is a program of the
International Society for Infectious Diseases
<http://www.isid.org>

Date: Sun 26 Aug 2018 3:28:16 PM AFT
Source: MENAFN [Middle East North Africa Financial Network]/Pajhwok
Afghan News [edited]
<https://menafn.com/1097345241/Afghanistan-records-267-Congo-cases-this-year>


At least 18 cases of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) infection
have recently been detected in Afghanistan, taking this year's [2018]
total cases to 267 compared to 244 cases last year.

The Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is caused by infection with
a tick-borne virus (_Nairovirus_) in the family Bunyaviridae. The
disease was first characterized in Crimea in 1944 and given the name
Crimean hemorrhagic fever.

The onset of CCHF is sudden, with initial signs and symptoms including
headache, high fever, back pain, joint pain, stomach pain, and
vomiting. Red eyes, a flushed face, a red throat, and petechiae (red
spots) on the palate are common.

Dr Shah Wali Marufi, in charge of preventing communicable diseases in
the Ministry of Public Health (MoPH), told Pajhwok Afghan News that
Congo virus cases increased each year during Eidul Adha [Eid al-Adha,
"Festival of Sacrifice"] days when people sacrifice animals.

He said so far 18 CCHF infection cases have been detected since the
1st day of Eidul Adha (21 Aug 2018), raising the number of the virus
cases to 267 this year.

Most of the CCHF cases were detected in Kabul and western Herat
province, Marufi said, without providing more details.

According to MoPH, 33 percent of those infected with the Congo virus
this year [2018] were women and the rest men including butchers,
shepherds, cooks, and others.

The ministry says 32 of the patients have died. The 1st case of the
disease in Afghanistan was found in 2013.

--
Communicated by:
ProMED-mail from HealthMap Alerts
<promed@promedmail.org>

[Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is the most widespread
tick-borne viral infection and one of the most rapidly emerging viral
hemorrhagic fevers in Africa, Asia, and Eastern Europe. Humans are
infected by tick bites or through close contact with infected animals
or humans. CCHF begins with a sudden onset of flu-like symptoms which
may progress to severe bleeding and be fatal if not treated.

"The disease is known to be endemic in Afghanistan, particularly in
the bordering areas with Iran and Pakistan where the movement of
nomads with their animals is concentrated. Up to 50 human cases of the
disease are reported every year on average. The disease is endemic in
other countries of the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR) of WHO
including Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Oman, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, and
the United Arab Emirates.

"Afghanistan has experienced an overall increasing trend of CCHF since
April 2017. There has been a significant surge in reported cases of
the disease during the first six months of 2018. During 2018, the most
affected province has been Herat where the highest number of CCHF
cases has been reported. Herat Province shares a long boarder with
Iran; it has the biggest animal market in the country. Huge cross
-border movement of the animals occur in this province, as well as
within the province."

Increased interaction between humans and livestock is particularly
high in the wake of special events like Eidul Adha thereby increasing
the risk for new cases. There are no vaccine prophylaxis or
therapeutic interventions available at present.

Therefore, appropriate containment measures should be undertaken to
address the ongoing upsurge in cases of CCHF in Afghanistan:
- enhanced surveillance of CCHF among humans and animals;
- strengthening of laboratory diagnosis;
- case management and effective infection prevention and control (IPC)
measures;
- effective coordination between human and animal health sectors, and
other relevant stakeholders.

There is also need for an effective community mobilization and
sensitization programme that should involve the community and
religious leaders. A multi sectoral approach is needed to address key
intervention components to ensure effective prevention and control of
the disease.

"Going forward, a better understanding of CCHF epidemiology is needed
for development of a long term prevention and control strategy. The
country requires a comprehensive prevention and control programme that
should address human as well as animal and tick populations."
(<https://reliefweb.int/report/afghanistan/who-emro-weekly-epidemiological-monitor-volume-11-issue-26-1-july-2018>).
- Mod.UBA

HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Afghanistan:
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/137>]

[See Also:
Crimean-Congo hem. fever - Afghanistan (02): (HR) update
http://promedmail.org/post/20180628.5881254
Crimean-Congo
hem. fever - Afghanistan: (Herat)
http://promedmail.org/post/20180622.5870770
2017
----
Crimean-Congo hem. fever - Afghanistan (03): 2017 cases, WHO
http://promedmail.org/post/20171223.5519514
Crimean-Congo
hem. fever - Afghanistan (02): WHO
http://promedmail.org/post/20171122.5459866
Crimean-Congo
hem. fever - Afghanistan: (HR)
http://promedmail.org/post/20170904.5285110
2016
----
Crimean-Congo hem. fever - Pakistan (13): (SD) fatal, ex Afghanistan
http://promedmail.org/post/20160901.4458312
2015
----
Crimean-Congo hem. fever - Pakistan (08): ex Afghanistan susp.
http://promedmail.org/post/20150803.3555191
Crimean-Congo
hem. fever - Pakistan (07): ex Afghanistan
http://promedmail.org/post/20150705.3485737
Crimean-Congo
hem. fever - Pakistan (05): ex Afghanistan, Iran
http://promedmail.org/post/20150625.3465423
Crimean-Congo
hem. fever - Pakistan (02): ex Afghanistan, additional
information http://promedmail.org/post/20150515.3365765
2014
----
Crimean-Congo hem. fever - Pakistan (03): Afghanistan susp.
http://promedmail.org/post/20140528.2503596
2013
----
Crimean-Congo hem. fever - Pakistan (05): ex Afghanistan
http://promedmail.org/post/20131007.1988889
2012
----
Crimean-Congo hem. fever - UK (03): (Scotland ex Afghanistan) strain
http://promedmail.org/post/20121129.1430971
Crimean-Congo
hem. fever - UK (02): (SCT ex Afghanistan) fatal outcome
http://promedmail.org/post/20121006.1328175
Crimean-Congo
hem. fever - UK: (SCT ex Afghanistan) airline pass.
http://promedmail.org/post/20121005.1326351
2011
----
Crimean-Congo hem. fever - Pakistan ex Afghanistan, nosocomial
http://promedmail.org/post/20110917.2833
2010
----
Crimean-Congo hem. fever - Pakistan ex Afghanistan: RFI
http://promedmail.org/post/20100629.2161]
.................................................uba/mj/dk
*##########################################################*
************************************************************
ProMED-mail makes every effort to verify the reports that
are posted, but the accuracy and completeness of the
information, and of any statements or opinions based
thereon, are not guaranteed. The reader assumes all risks in
using information posted or archived by ProMED-mail. ISID
and its associated service providers shall not be held
responsible for errors or omissions or held liable for any
damages incurred as a result of use or reliance upon posted
or archived material.
************************************************************
Donate to ProMED-mail. Details available at:
<http://www.isid.org/donate/>
************************************************************
Visit ProMED-mail's web site at <http://www.promedmail.org>.
Send all items for posting to: promed@promedmail.org (NOT to
an individual moderator). If you do not give your full name
name and affiliation, it may not be posted. You may unsub-
scribe at <http://ww4.isid.org/promedmail/subscribe.php>.
For assistance from a human being, send mail to:
<postmaster@promedmail.org>.
############################################################
############################################################

List-Unsubscribe: http://ww4.isid.org/promedmail/subscribe.php

0 comments:

Post a Comment