Wednesday, August 29, 2018

PRO/AH/EDR> Plague - USA (03): (WY) feline

PLAGUE - USA (03): (WYOMING) FELINE
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Date: Wed 29 Aug 2018
Source: Casper Star Tribune [edited]
<https://bit.ly/2LzeT8k>


A cat in Big Horn has been confirmed to have been infected with
plague, the state Department of Health announced [Wed 29 Aug 2018].

There are no known human cases in that area or in Wyoming as a whole.
There hasn't been a confirmed case since 2008, according to a
department press release. The cat "is known to wander outdoors," the
release said.

The case comes a little over a year after the plague was found in
prairie dogs in the Thunder Basin National Grassland, the 1st time the
disease popped up there in more than 15 years.

"Plague is a serious bacterial infection that can be deadly for pets
and for people if not treated as soon as possible with antibiotics,"
Alexia Harrist, state health officer and epidemiologist, said in a
statement. "The disease can be transmitted to humans from ill animals
and by fleas coming from infected animals."

Department spokeswoman Kim Deti did not immediately return a request
for comment late [Wed 29 Aug 2018] morning.

There have been just 6 cases of plague in humans here since 1978,
according to the department. The United States overall averages 7
human cases a year.

Signs in pets include swelling in the neck, face or ears; lack of
energy; fever; chills; coughing; vomiting; diarrhea; and dehydration.
Humans have similar symptoms, along with difficulty breathing,
headaches and abdominal pain.

The department recommends using insect repellent on boots and pants in
areas possibly having fleas; using flea repellent on pets; properly
disposing of rodents brought home by pets; avoid exposure and contact
to rodents dead or alive; and avoid areas with "unexplained rodent
die-offs." [Please use pet specific flea repellant as some repellants
not intended for cats can cause death. - Mod.TG]

[Byline: Seth Klamann]

--
Communicated by:
ProMED-mail
<promed@promedmail.org>

[Plague is primarily a disease of wild rodents. It is caused by the
bacterium _Yersinia pestis_, which is mainly spread by the bites of
infectious fleas. The bacterium is not native to North America. When
it was introduced, it became established in some rodent populations.
Surveillance efforts testing fleas are very important to detect
circulation of _Y. pestis_ and risk of infection.

Plague may infect human beings through several routes: 1) the bite of
an infected flea carried by a rodent or, rarely, other animals
(mentioned previously; 2) direct contact with contaminated tissues,
generally from an animal; or 3) in rare cases, inhalation of
respiratory secretions from infected people or animals.

Clinical signs in pets involve a localized swelling, such as under the
jaw in cats, but also in the inguinal region or under the front leg
(the armpit, if you will), lethargy, anorexia, and fever. These
clinical signs may be present in the dog as well. Swelling under the
jaw in cats is frequently mistaken as a cat fight abscess.

Please take your pet to a veterinarian if you notice any
abnormalities. Be sure to consult your veterinarian if you find a lump
on your pet, as well as to get the best flea prevention treatment for
your pet. It may be necessary to have your yard and/or home treated
for fleas. Vacuum your home, including any bedding and furniture, and
immediately upon finishing take the vacuum back outside, seal it in a
plastic bag, and dispose of it. This type of cleaning will have to be
repeated every week for 3-6 weeks to break the cycle of the flea in
the home. This disease should be taken seriously, so please be sure
your pet is on some form of flea prevention.

If your pets are not on flea prevention, please ask your veterinarian
about the best flea prevention. Bathing your pet in dishwashing soap
is not sufficient to help your pet avoid diseases carried by fleas.
Some of the over the counter flea preventions may be harmful to your
pet so please check with your veterinarian. It is also a good time to
make sure your pet is current on a rabies shot.

Keeping your pets inside is best and inside a yard will help diminish
the ability to consume a dead animal and further reduce the risk of
plague to your animal and to yourself. - Mod.TG

HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Wyoming, United States: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/251>]

[See Also:
Plague - USA (02): (ID) http://promedmail.org/post/20180614.5856107
Plague - USA: (NM) canine http://promedmail.org/post/20180331.5721677
2017
----
Plague - USA (14): (CA) bear, exposure
http://promedmail.org/post/20171213.5501299
Plague - USA (13): (AZ) bubonic, infected fleas, alert
http://promedmail.org/post/20170815.5251542
Plague - USA (12): (NM) bubonic, squirrel, alert
http://promedmail.org/post/20170811.5244152
Plague - USA (11): (AZ) bubonic, prairie dog, die-off
http://promedmail.org/post/20170807.5233248
Plague - USA (10): (AZ,TX) bubonic, prairie dogs, fleas
http://promedmail.org/post/20170723.5197563
Plague - USA (09): (TX) prairie dog, alert
http://promedmail.org/post/20170704.5150405
Plague - USA (08): (NM) http://promedmail.org/post/20170626.5132081
Plague - USA (07): (CO) feline
http://promedmail.org/post/20170615.5108564
Plague - USA (06): (NM) http://promedmail.org/post/20170606.5087671
Plague - USA (05): (CO) feline, bubonic, alert: corr
http://promedmail.org/post/20170506.5017288
Plague - USA (05): (CO) feline, bubonic, alert
http://promedmail.org/post/20170505.5014699
Plague - USA (04): (NM) feral cat, alert
http://promedmail.org/post/20170419.4980169
Plague - USA (03): (NM) feline, canine
http://promedmail.org/post/20170412.4965194
Plague - USA (02): (CO) prairie dog, alert
http://promedmail.org/post/20170318.4910519
Plague - USA: (NM) canine http://promedmail.org/post/20170211.4832639
2016
----
Plague, animal - USA (06): (ID) cat recovering, ground squirrel
http://promedmail.org/post/20160616.4290356
Plague, animal - USA (05): (ID) domestic cat, ground squirrel
http://promedmail.org/post/20160615.4287888
Plague, animal - USA (03): (ID) ground squirrel, domestic cat, susp
http://promedmail.org/post/20160604.4265294
2015
----
Plague, animal - USA (08): (ID) vole, susp.
http://promedmail.org/post/20150617.3443480
Plague, animal - USA (07): (ID) canine
http://promedmail.org/post/20150608.3417597
1997--
Yersinia pestis vaccine http://promedmail.org/post/19970907.1927
Yersinia pestis, antibiotic resistance - Madagascar
http://promedmail.org/post/19970905.1911]
.................................................tg/ao/dk
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