Saturday, September 8, 2018

PRO/AH/EDR> Invasive tick - USA (15): (NJ)

INVASIVE TICK - USA (15): (NEW JERSEY)
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International Society for Infectious Diseases
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Date: Fri 7 Sep 2018
Source: My Central Jersey [edited]
<https://eu.mycentraljersey.com/story/news/local/land-environment/2018/09/07/asian-longhorned-tick-somerset-county/1226977002/>


The exotic tick unknown to the United States before being discovered
in Hunterdon County earlier this year [2018] has surfaced in Somerset
County, the New Jersey Department of Agriculture announced Friday [7
Sep 2018]. The longhorned tick has also been found in Middlesex, Union
and Mercer counties in central New Jersey.

The US Department of Agriculture's National Veterinary Services
Laboratory (NVSL) on Friday [7 Sep 2018] confirmed the Asian
longhorned tick, also known as _Haemaphysalis longicornis_, was
discovered in Somerset County, making it the 7th county in New Jersey
where the tick has been found.

The tick was found on a dog at a residence and was confirmed to be the
longhorned tick earlier this week [around 4 Sep 2018]. Earlier
findings have also been confirmed in Bergen and Monmouth counties.

Some of these findings have come as a result of residents submitting
ticks to the county drop-off locations, where the ticks are picked up
and sent for testing. A list of county drop-off locations can be found
at <www.state.nj.us/agriculture/>.

"The public has played an important role in helping us identify areas
where this tick may be located," said Manoel Tamassia, the New Jersey
Department of Agriculture State Veterinarian, in a statement. "The
knowledge we have gained from these findings will help us make
decisions at local and national levels."

Public parks where the longhorned tick has been found in New Jersey
include Davidson Mill County Pond Park in Middlesex County, Overpeck
County Park in Bergen County and Watchung Reservation, Houdaille
Quarry Park and Briant Park in Union County. There have also been
confirmed findings of the longhorned tick in Connecticut, Maryland,
Pennsylvania, New York, North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia and
Arkansas.

Various local, state and federal animal health agencies, as well as
Rutgers Center for Vector Biology, continue to work together to
identify the range of the Asian longhorned tick in New Jersey.
Longhorned ticks that have been collected in New Jersey thus far have
tested negative for various human and animal pathogens.

Like deer ticks, the nymphs of the Asian longhorned tick are very
small (resembling tiny spiders) and can easily go unnoticed on animals
and people. Longhorned ticks in other countries have been shown to
spread diseases. They are known to infest a wide range of species,
including humans, dogs, cats and livestock.

A phone line has also been established to leave a message if a tick is
found and there is uncertainty about what the next steps are. If you
need information about what to do if you find a tick on yourself, your
pets or livestock, call 1-833-NEWTICK (1-833-639-8425). For more
information on ticks and tick-borne disease, visit Rutgers Center for
Vector Biology at <www.vectorbio.rutgers.edu/>.

[Byline: Nick Muscavage]

--
Communicated by:
ProMED-mail from HealthMap Alerts
<promed@promedmail.org>

[With detection of this tick in another New Jersey county, the
longhorned tick has become widespread in New Jersey. This tick
doubtless is now established in the eastern USA. As noted earlier,
either the tick is spreading rapidly or surveillance has been
intensified, or both. With discovery of this tick in widely divergent
localities in the USA in the past 8 months, one wonders whether it is
being moved via birds or by infested domestic animals.

As the report above indicates, this tick is a vector of important
pathogens that infect people and domestic animals. Fortunately, so far
there is no evidence for this tick transmitting the tickborne
pathogens that already occur in the eastern USA, such as Powassan
virus and Lyme borreliosis. All tests for the presence of these
pathogens in the ticks has been negative so far. One hopes that there
will be intensified surveillance in broad areas in the eastern USA to
find out whether there are additional longhorned ticks in the area.
Ticks can be extremely difficult to control once established in an
area.

Images of _Haemaphysalis longicornis_ can be seen at the URL above and
at
<https://entomologytoday.org/2018/02/21/native-asia-found-new-jersey-curious-case-invasive-tick/>
and
<https://openi.nlm.nih.gov/detailedresult.php?img=PMC3279682_kjp-49-419-g004&req=4>.
- Mod.TY

HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
New Jersey, United States: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/232>]

[See Also:
Invasive tick - USA (14): (CT)
http://promedmail.org/post/20180831.6000815
Invasive tick - USA (13): (NJ)
http://promedmail.org/post/20180829.5996004
Invasive tick - USA (12): (NYC)
http://promedmail.org/post/20180816.5969769
Invasive tick - USA (11): (PA)
http://promedmail.org/post/20180801.5942213
Invasive tick - USA (10): (NJ)
http://promedmail.org/post/20180729.5934413
Invasive tick - USA (09): (NY)
http://promedmail.org/post/20180719.5915226
Invasive tick - USA (08): (NC)
http://promedmail.org/post/20180715.5907203
Invasive tick - USA (07) http://promedmail.org/post/20180709.5894427
Invasive tick - USA (06): (AR)
http://promedmail.org/post/20180613.5852550
Invasive tick - USA (05): (VA)
http://promedmail.org/post/20180603.5836650
Invasive tick - USA (04): (WV)
http://promedmail.org/post/20180530.5828951
Invasive tick - USA (03): (VA) comment
http://promedmail.org/post/20180524.5815471
Invasive tick - USA (02): (VA) comment
http://promedmail.org/post/20180521.5807725
Invasive tick - USA: (VA) http://promedmail.org/post/20180519.5806284]
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